Second Annual PA Donor Day, Jan. 8, 2021

Not in Pennsylvania?

Sign Up

 
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Del Du-Bois has End Stage Kidney Disease and desperately needs a life-saving donor kidney, blood type O; His best chances are a kidney from a living donor.
You can make a difference.
Please help spread the word to your family members, friends, co-workers,
or any groups you are affiliated with.
Del Du-Bois is registered at RJW Barnabas Health (NJ) https://bit.ly/31gfIOK

 

From Web MD: Warning Signs of Kidney Problems

Your kidneys filter waste from your blood and ship it out in your pee. When your kidneys don’t work right, toxins can build up. That can lead to several different — and surprising — symptoms. …  READ MORE

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Del Du-Bois has End Stage Kidney Disease and desperately needs a life-saving donor kidney, blood type O; His best chances are a kidney from a living donor.
You can make a difference.
Please help spread the word to your family members, friends, co-workers,
or any groups you are affiliated with.
Del Du-Bois is registered at RJW Barnabas Health (NJ) https://bit.ly/31gfIOK

Del & his wife of 50 years.

Please call to get tested today.
PLEASE SAVE A LIFE!
Mention Del Du-Bois when you call.
(even if you are NOT type-O, you can still donate a kidney and start a Chain Donation for Del)
Organ donation saves lives for a lot of people.
Be a Hero!

Call/Text Del’s family ~ (732) 485-3522

You cannot sell organs ~ We cannot buy an organ

In the recent past we have gotten queries from people offering their kidney FOR PAYMENT — while we are anxious to get our loved husband, father, grandfather, uncle, and brother a new kidney, it is ILLEGAL to sell or buy a kidney in the United States.

“Organ trafficking is possibly one of the most covert forms of human trafficking. A global shortage of organs has driven the industry, relying on poor populations to be donors and wealthy foreigners to be recipients.” (https://bit.ly/39oJchp)

We appreciate the efforts to get Del a kidney, but we cannot BUY one.

6 yrs on Dialysis…Del Du-Bois desperately needs a Type-O kidney.
Del is registered at RWJ Barnabas in NJ, https://bit.ly/3qeJNbt
Please give Del’s name when you call.
Even if you aren’t Type O, you can start a chain donation in Del’s name.

42 U.S. Code § 274e – Prohibition of organ purchases

Prohibition: It shall be unlawful for any person to knowingly acquire, receive, or otherwise transfer any human organ for valuable consideration for use in human transplantation if the transfer affects interstate commerce. The preceding sentence does not apply with respect to human organ paired donation.
The term “human organ” means the human (including fetal) kidney, liver, heart, lung, pancreas, bone marrow, cornea, eye, bone, and skin or any subpart thereof and any other human organ (or any subpart thereof, including that derived from a fetus) specified by the Secretary of Health and Human Services by regulation.

  • Selling Organs: The National Organ Transplant Act Under the federal National Organ Transplant Act of 1984 (NOTA) — found in Title 42, section 274e of the U.S. Code — anyone convicted of buying or selling human organs in the United States faces a five-year prison sentence and/or a fine of up to $50,000.   (from FindLaw) 

Monk: Donating organs ‘good karma’
(video)

Information about Kidney Transplants

KNOW YOUR KIDNEYS
(from American Kidney Fund)

When you have kidney failure, also known as end-stage renal disease (ESRD), you either need dialysis or a kidney transplant to live. Kidney transplant is considered the best treatment option for people facing kidney failure because it can increase your chances of living a longer, healthier life. Having a kidney transplant can be a life-changing opportunity. You may get a kidney transplant when your kidneys are close to failure, before you need to start dialysis. Or you may start dialysis while you wait for a kidney transplant.

Kidney transplant surgery is considered safe, and is usually very successful. A successful kidney transplant depends on how healthy you are before the transplant, taking care of yourself after your transplant, and closely following your doctors’ orders after the transplant.

Research has shown that patients who get a kidney from a living donor live longer than patients who get a kidney from a deceased donor (someone who has just died). On average, living kidney donor transplants last 15-20 years, and deceased kidney donor transplants last 10-15 years.

(read more about Kidney Transplants…)

“Decisions made by Congress and federal and state government agencies affect the quality of care that kidney patients receive, the amount of available funding for kidney disease research, and a myriad of other factors that impact the kidney patient experience. The American Kidney Fund continuously monitors regulations, legislation and policy issues that may affect kidney patients and their families. We work with Congress, the administration, federal agencies, and state governments to advance a legislative and regulatory policy agenda that will protect the patients we serve.”

Please help save Del’s life.
We are asking for your help, he desperately needs a Type O kidney.

Call or Text: 732-485-3522

Get tested, mention Del Du-Bois’ name and
even if you are not a match for him you can save someone else’s life
and put Del higher up on the transplant list.

Del is listed at multiple hospitals including:
St Barnabas Medical Center Transplant
94 Old Short Hills Rd Ste 1
Livingston, NJ 07039
(973) 322-8216

Be Our HERO

 

Image may contain: text that says 'Your organ could be someone's MISSING piece 青'

Please help save Del’s life.
We are asking for your help, he desperately needs a Type O kidney.

Call or Text: 732-485-3522

Del has been on both the Transplant List AND on Dialysis for SIX (6) years.
Living Donors give patients the BEST chances to live a normal life

The shortage of organs causes most patients to wait for a transplant.

Please HELP and be our HERO.

Get tested, mention Del Du-Bois’ name and
even if you are not a match for him you can save someone else’s life
and put Del higher up on the transplant list.

https://www.facebook.com/kidney4del/

You can make a difference.
Please help spread the word to your family members, friends, co-workers,
or any groups you are affiliated with.

Del is listed at multiple hospitals including:

St Barnabas Medical Center Transplant
94 Old Short Hills Rd Ste 1
Livingston, NJ 07039
(973) 322-8216

Del’s Best Chances Are From A Living Donor

Del has End Stage Kidney Disease and desperately needs a life-saving donor kidney, blood type O; His best chances are a kidney from a living donor.
You can make a difference.
Please help spread the word to your family members, friends, co-workers,
or any groups you are affiliated with.
Del Du-Bois is registered at RJW Barnabas Health (NJ) https://bit.ly/31gfIOK

Image may contain: outdoor, text that says 'YOU THINK THIS LINE IS LONG... "|| mIL NOW IMAGINE WAITING FOR AN ORGAN TRANSPLANT.'

Please call to get tested today.
PLEASE SAVE A LIFE!
Mention Del Du-Bois when you call.
(even if you are NOT type-O, you can still donate a kidney and start a Chain Donation for Del)
Organ donation saves lives for a lot of people.
Be a Hero!

Call/Text Del’s family ~ (732) 485-3522

The Family is Growing

Del & Bobi’s family is growing!

They have two sons, Russ & Mike, and two daughter-in-loves, Lisa & Shruthi. And there is wonderfully exciting news as the family grows bigger.

2011: Mike, Shruthi, Lisa, Hannah, Russ, Kayla, Bobi & Del

Russ and Lisa’s two daughters, Kayla and Hannah, are both engaged!!!
Mike and Shruthi are expecting their second child very soon!!!

Shruthi's Bangle ceremony

Shankar, Nirmalah, Shruthi, Mike, Bobi & Del 2020 – expectant grandparents & parents

There are so many happy celebrations going on and wonderful additions to look forward to.
Del is a wonderful grandfather, his grandchildren call him “Abba”.

But Del STILL needs a kidney. He goes for dialysis three times a week and is so tired each time. We desperately need your help.

Visit our Facebook Page and please SHARE

Del Du-Bois is registered at
RJW Barnabas Health (NJ), Tampa General Hospital (FL), and Renewal.org

Please call to get tested today.
PLEASE SAVE A LIFE.
Mention Del Du-Bois when you call.

(even if you are NOT type-O, you can still donate a kidney and start a Chain Donation for Del)

Help Me Write An HEA

As a romance author I am used to writing Happily Ever After (HEA) endings — I’m hoping that someone will help us to “write” an HEA for my family. My brother, Del (legally my brother-in-law) desperately needs a kidney. Del has Polycystic Kidney Disease and is now in End Stage Kidney Disease. He is registered with RJWBarnabas Health (NJ)  and a few other hospitals as well as with Renewal.

Everywhere I look lately it seems that there are many people needing new kidneys, I’m not a doctor or scientist, but it seems so prevalent. the number of people requiring a kidney transplant has been increasing each year, the number of transplants received has remained at a stable and alarmingly low level over the years.

I read stories about folks searching for matches (living donors provide the best chances AND most of us have two working kidneys so can afford to donate one). It is so heartbreaking thought to read how loving relatives and friends have tried to donate a kidney only to find that they are not compatible matches. I have a suggestion for you…

If you are not a compatible match, see if you are a match for another person in need, like Del, and begin a donation chain in your friend’s name. You will save multiple lives and move your friend’s name closer to the top so that the chances of finding a compatible donation are much greater. Likewise, you can get tested for Del Du-Bois (he needs a type O kidney) and if you are not compatible you can start a donation chain in Del’s name; this goes for any blood type.

Del is a husband, dad, grandfather, brother and a wonderful friend. He has been active in his community and his house of worship, and also with a local observatory where he has helped educate young minds in the study of astronomy. He is very loved by his family and friends alike.

Would you please help give my family, and so many others who need a kidney, a chance for a Happily Ever After? Thank you.

Wishing you and yours a wonderful, happy and healthy holiday season and New Year.

Visit our Facebook Page and please SHARE
Del Needs A Kidney

 Our website
A Kidney for Del Du-Bois

my husband & me, and my sister & Del

my husband & me, and my sister & Del

 

What 37 Million American Adults Don’t Know…

37 Million American Adults Now Estimated to Have Chronic Kidney Disease

Update from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention still shows most with CKD don’t know they have it
New York, NY – July 17, 2019 – The number of American adults who have chronic kidney disease (CKD) is now estimated to be 37 million – that’s one out of every seven or 15 percent of the adult population – according to the latest data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).
The higher estimate in the number of Americans affected by chronic kidney disease, versus statistics reported in previous years, is due to several factors including an aging population and increased prevalence of risk factors such as diabetes and hypertension, according to the CDC.
Approximately 90 percent of people who have CKD are not even aware of it. In fact, one of every two people with very low kidney function, and who are not on dialysis, don’t know they have CKD. The National Kidney Foundation (NKF) estimates that one of every three adults – some 80 million people – is at risk for CKD. It is the 9th leading cause of death in the U.S., killing more people than breast cancer or prostate cancer, according to the CDC.
“Chronic kidney disease is the most under-recognized public health crisis in this country, and now, with 37 million people suffering, it’s time for more Americans finally to take notice,” said Kevin Longino, CEO, National Kidney Foundation. “NKF will continue to lead the way in rallying action on this problem by increasing CKD awareness, prevention, early detection, advocacy for kidney patients, and support for research to improve treatment and outcomes.”
Chronic kidney disease means both kidneys are damaged and losing their ability to keep an individual healthy. Dialysis or a kidney transplant is needed to stay alive.  Kidney failure treated with dialysis or a kidney transplant is called end-stage kidney disease (ESKD).
Other key CDC findings are that CKD is more common in American women (15 percent) than in men (12 percent).  People of African American, Hispanic, Native American, Asian or Pacific Islander descent are at increased risk for developing the disease. African Americans are about 3 times more likely than Whites to develop ESKD. Compared to non-Hispanics, Hispanics are almost 1.3 times more likely to receive a diagnosis of kidney failure. These minority populations have high rates of diabetes or high blood pressure, putting them at higher risk for ESKD. Risk factors for CKD include having diabetes, high blood pressure, family history of kidney failure, being age 60 or older, obesity, heart disease and past damage to kidneys.
The CDC study, which analyzed adults aged 18 years or older with CKD stages 1-4, used data from the 2013-2016 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey and the CKD Epidemiology Collaboration (CKD-EPI) equation.
Kidney Disease Facts
In the United States, 37 million adults are estimated to have chronic kidney disease(CKD) – and most aren’t aware of it.  1 in 3 American adults is at risk for CKD.  Risk factors for kidney disease include diabetes, high blood pressure, heart disease, obesity, a family history of kidney failure, and being age 60 or older. People of African American, Hispanic, Native American, Asian or Pacific Islander descent are at increased risk for developing the disease. African Americans are about 3 times more likely than Whites to develop end-stage kidney disease (ESKD or kidney failure). Compared to non-Hispanics, Hispanics are almost 1.3 times more likely to receive a diagnosis of kidney failure.
The National Kidney Foundation (NKF) is the largest, most comprehensive, and longstanding patient-centric organization dedicated to the awareness, prevention, and treatment of kidney disease in the U.S. For more information about NKF, visit www.kidney.org.